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ABaHB--The only blog dedicated to all things LEGO mosaics.--JumboBricks

A Blog by Casey M. and Katie W. | Guest writing by Dave W. and Sean & Steph M.

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

A Developing Trend? A Discussion on Scatter Mosaics

Bart De Dobbelaer (Flickr user) just recently posted his third entry for the Iron Builder competition against our own authoring team Sean and Steph Mayo. The entry was titled "Fiery Lips" and is using what I'm hearing is called the "scattered mosaic" or "scattered brick technique". It includes (but is not limited to) using a random assortment of piece types in the same color to create shapes.

Fiery Lips

The above mosaic utilizes the technique found in the previously blogged (by Katie) Spiderman mosaic by Xenomurphy in December (Seen below). (Check out the original post here )
 

Bricko also made a superhero scatter mosaic after seeing Xenomurphy's. This one, is a interpretation of the Dark Knight himself, Batman.
The Caped Crusader: A Scatter Mosaic

I think this new form of mosaic has a lot of potential, but one must be very precise about how they make the shapes or it could look...odd. It's all about the fine details of curves and shapes. For me, I think it's a great new building style, but is not even a real creation as little to no bricks are connected. You can't transport them anywhere. ;-(

What do you think of them? Let us know in the comments.

4 comments:

  1. I've noticed the trend, too. I've posted more than one "scatter mosaic". I'm not sure where that name came from, but it seems like a good one. It would be incredibly difficult to take one to a show; you'd probably have to make it on-site. Though there is something to be said for photography of scatter mosaics as an art form. I'm thinking of Mike Doyle's abandoned houses. He says he does them to make a single image, and then he sells photographs. He has had the photographs on display in art galleries, but not the original model, which gets dismantled. So I think it can be viable in that way. It's just another way to create with LEGO.

    ;-)

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  2. I should add that I've made lots of creations that were like scatter mosaics, just not "scattered." For example, this: http://www.flickr.com/photos/eilonwy77/6116704107/in/set-72157629787141192

    Almost none of those pieces are connected. And then there was Sean and Steph's Avalon -- not scattered, but not connected either.

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, good point. Technically a lot of the cheese-slope constructions aren't actually connected, just tight fits. I find myself getting less "purist" for having everything connect too, especially with Bionicle building.

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  3. From my view point, the question is : what is the added value by using lego parts insteed of other materials for building a mosaic ?
    For usual mosaics, using lego parts can be view as an easy way to do it and to have the possibility to use the parts again for an other building. For most other kind of mosaics (like the cheese-slope ones), the added value comes from the possible integration into a larger lego building.
    For these scatter mosaics, there is none : it's a kind of ephemer art which has nothing to do with a building (the parts are even not fit together).

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